Jill Hopke

Environmental Communication. Social Movements. Mobile Media.

Tag: climate change (page 1 of 4)

“Creating Your Laudato Si’ Narrative” Archdiocese of Chicago Presentation

I am giving a presentation on climate change communication for the Archdiocese of Chicago’s Office of Human Dignity and Solidarity on Wednesday. The event description, my slides and links to additional resources are below.

“Join the Office of Human Dignity and Solidarity on Wednesday, June 6 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. as we answer Pope Francis’ call to ‘each person on this living planet’ to care for our common home. Because everyone’s home is different, creating effective campaigns around this initiative can be challenging.

During this seminary, Assistant Professor of Journalism Jill Hopke of DePaul University will share insights from the latest social science research on how to design communication strategies that connect climate change to daily life and tips for choosing engaging climate visuals. Participants will get ideas for how to tell new narratives about the human toll of our changing climate, as well as for building community resiliency and climate hope.”

Wednesday, June 6, 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Cardinal Meyer Center
3525 South Lake Park Avenue
Chicago, IL 60653

To register, click here.

Continue reading

New DePaul undergraduate course in climate change communication

I will be teaching a new undergraduate course in climate change communication at DePaul University in the winter quarter. The course is part of the university minors in Environmental Communication and Climate Change Science and Policy.

If you are an instructor at another university, or a student interested in enrolling, please feel free to contact me with any questions. The syllabus is below.

JOUR 311 / CMNS 363: Climate Change Communication

DePaul University, College of Communication

Section 201 / 501, Class 2504 / 25225, Winter Quarter 2018

Room 314 Arts and Letters Hall, Lincoln Park Campus, Monday / Wednesday 2:40 to 4:10 p.m.

Instructor: Dr. Jill Hopke, Assistant Professor of Journalism

Contact: jhopke@depaul.edu (I strive to respond to emails within one business day, excluding weekends); 312-362-7641 (office)

Office location: 1123 Daley, 14 E. Jackson, Loop Campus

Office hours: Mondays 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. and Wednesdays 11:00 to 11:30 a.m. in my Loop office; directly following class in the LPC (and by email appointment)

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jillhopke

Course Description

Individuals make up their minds on climate change, energy development, and other science of pressing public policy importance through a complex set of factors: values, demographics, political ideology, and so on. Journalists, strategic communicators, scientists, and policy analysts need to be able to communicate effectively with diverse public audiences on climate and energy topics. This course is oriented from a science communication perspective and draws on social scientific research on communicating on climate change and energy issues. We will take a human perspective on climate issues and focuses on the social, political and cultural aspects of climate change. The course covers best practices for promoting and facilitating public dialogue on climate change policy and global energy systems. Topics covered include: climate change public opinion and knowledge, media portrayals of climate change and its societal effects, climate skepticism and denial, psychological factors that contribute to values and beliefs on climate science, journalism and covering climate issues, framing and developing narratives on climate impacts, and climate change in popular culture. Students will conduct original research to analyze and evaluate climate change communication. For the final project, students have the option of completing a major journalistic reporting project, designing an advocacy or marketing campaign, or conducting a research project.

Learning Objectives

After completing this course, you should be able to:

  • Explain the function of communication in shaping attitudes, values, practices and policy on climate change and energy issues in the United States and internationally;
  • Understand the role of worldviews, perceptions, and beliefs in shaping public opinion on climate change and energy development;
  • Understand the roots of climate denialism in a U.S. political context and internationally;
  • Identify and evaluate mechanisms for communicating on climate science and energy issues; and
  • Identify and evaluate rhetoric and visual communication generated, and used by, those communicating about climate change and energy topics.

Continue reading

“Communicating on Climate Change” talk at DePaul University

I am giving a talk on Tuesday as part of the kickoff event for DePaul University’s new undergraduate minor in Climate Change Science and Policy.

The talk will be in the Lincoln Park Campus, 11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m., in McGowan South.

My slides from the talk are available below:

In the winter 2018 quarter I will be teaching a new undergraduate course that is part of the minor in Climate Change Communication.

JOUR 311/ CMNS 363: Climate Change Communication

Monday / Wednesday

2:40 to 4:10 p.m.

Lincoln Park Campus

The course description is as follows:

JOUR 311/CMNS 363: Climate Change Communication

Course Description:
Individuals make up their minds on climate change, energy development, and other science of pressing public policy importance through a complex set of factors: values, demographics, political ideology, and so on. Journalists, strategic communicators, scientists, and policy analysts need to be able to communicate effectively with diverse public audiences on climate and energy topics. This course is oriented from a science communication perspective and draws on social scientific research on communicating on climate change and energy issues. We will take a human perspective on climate issues and focuses on the social, political and cultural aspects of climate change. The course covers best practices for promoting and facilitating public dialogue on climate change policy and global energy systems. Topics covered include: climate change public opinion and knowledge, media portrayals of climate change and its societal effects, climate skepticism and denial, psychological factors that contribute to values and beliefs on climate science, journalism and covering climate issues, framing and developing narratives on climate impacts, and climate change in popular culture. Students will conduct original research to analyze and evaluate climate change communication. For the final project, students have the option of completing a major journalistic reporting project, designing an advocacy or marketing campaign, or conducting a research project.

For registration:
JOUR 311: Section 201; Class # 25204
CMNS 363: Section 501; Class # 25225

For questions or the syllabus, please contact Dr. Jill Hopke, jhopke@depaul.edu.

Talk slides “The Moral Case for Sustainable Investing”

On Thursday I am giving a talk at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro on social and sustainable investing.

The event is a conversation on the theme of “What is Sustainable and Socially Responsible Investing and Why Is It Important?” The event will take place Thursday, Sept. 28 at 3:30 p.m. in the UNCG Faculty Center. This conversation is hosted by the UNCG departments of Environmental & Sustainability Studies and Geography.

I will be joined by my colleague Luis Hestres (University of Texas at San Antonio). We will be talking about research we published in the Oxford Research Encyclopedia of Climate Science . Our paper is available open access (for a limited time) here.

For more information on the event and the yearlong speaker series it kicks-off, visit here.

University of North Carolina at Greensboro talk on sustainable and socially responsible investing, Sept. 28

On Thursday, September 28 I will be giving a talk at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, joined by my colleague Luis Hestres (University of Texas at San Antonio), on sustainable and socially responsible investing.

The event is a conversation on the theme of “What is Sustainable and Socially Responsible Investing and Why Is It Important?” The event will take place Thursday, Sept. 28 at 3:30 p.m. in the UNCG Faculty Center. This conversation is hosted by the UNCG departments of Environmental & Sustainability Studies and Geography.

For more information on the event and the yearlong speaker series it kicks-off, visit here. Continue reading

Older posts

© 2018 Jill Hopke

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑